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The Pan-Arabia Enquirer

The Pan-Arabia Enquirer

What Caused Napoleon To Reach An Agreement With The Pope

What Caused Napoleon To Reach An Agreement With The Pope

The Concorda of 1801 was an agreement between France – represented by Napoleon Bonaparte – and both the Church in France and the papacy in the square of the Roman Catholic Church in France. This first sentence is a bit false, because while the Concorda was officially a religious colony in the name of the French nation, Napoleon and the objectives of the future French empire were so massively central, it is essentially Napoleon and the papacy. The abduction was the culmination of the combative relationship between the world leader of the Catholic Church and the screaming emperor. From the beginning of the papacy of Pius VII in 1800 until the fall of Napoleon in 1815, the two men stood constantly on the jam, the French military chief being regularly irritated by the Pope`s refusal to respond to his demands. In 1805, Pie was deeply irritated by the French invasion of papal territory. Troops led by Gouvion St-Cyr, who withdrew from Calabria, had been sent to occupy Ancona (a strategic port on the east coast of Italy) to prevent a British landing during the Austerlitz campaign. On November 13, 1805, Pie (certainly known about the result at Ulm, but perhaps also aware of Trafalgar) was written to write a letter of remembrance to Napoleon. His complaint was severely directed against the occupation of Ancona, calling for the evacuation of French troops and deploring Napoleon`s reluctance to offer a counter-offer for all the papal benevolence shown up to that date (especially The agreement of Pius for the coronation and consecration to Come to Paris). Napoleon did not respond immediately. After all, he was in the middle of Austerlitz.

He finally wrote to Pius of Munich on January 7, 1806, strong after the Treaty of Pressburg.3 He was furious at what he saw as the Vatican`s refusal to form a consortium with Britain and Russia, allowing the agents of these two countries to operate freely in the papal states. He called the Pope`s letter a sting in the back. Pie, he said, gave the impression that he believed Napoleon and the Empire were lost (the emperor may have suspected that the pope knew about the defeat of the sea). Napoleon insulted the Pope for his unceasing attitude towards France and claimed the moral and religious summit as the “senior son of the Church”. 4 The French emperor also wrote on the same day to Cardinal Fesch, who called P`ope`s letter “ridiculous and futile” and encouraged his uncle and French ambassador to the Holy See to forward his letter to the Vatican.

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