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The Pan-Arabia Enquirer

The Pan-Arabia Enquirer

Why Was The Munich Agreement A Failure

Why Was The Munich Agreement A Failure

… The solution to the Czechoslovakian problem that has just been found is, in my opinion, only the prelude to a larger colony in which all Europe can find peace. This morning I had another meeting with the German Chancellor, Mr. Hitler, and this is the document that bears his name, as well as mine. Some of you may have already heard what it contains, but I`d just like to read it to you: ` … We consider the agreement signed last night and the Anglo-German naval agreement as a symbol of the desire of our two peoples never to go to war again. [96] On September 15, 1938, In the face of high tensions between the Germans and the Czechoslovakian government, the heirs secretly proposed giving 6,000 square kilometres to Czechoslovakia to Germany, in exchange for a German accession agreement of 1.5 to 2.0 million South German Germans that would expel Czechoslovakia. Hitler did not respond. [13] As a result of the agreement, German troops crossed the border on 1 October and were warmly welcomed by the Sudeten Germans, while many Czechoslovakians fled the area. On his way back to London, Chamberlain announced that he had secured “peace for our time.” While many in the British government were satisfied with the result, others were not. Winston Churchill called the Munich agreement a “total and total defeat.” After believing that he had to fight to claim the Sudetenland, Hitler was surprised that the former allies of Czechoslovakia had voluntarily left the country to appease him. The British people expected an imminent war and Chamberlain`s “state gesture” was initially applauded. He was greeted as a hero by the royal family and invited to the balcony of Buckingham Palace before submitting the agreement to the British Parliament.

The general positive reaction quickly re-established despite the royal patronage. However, there was resistance from the beginning. Clement Attlee and labor rejected the deal in alliance with the two Conservative MPs Duff Cooper and Vyvyan Adams, who until then had been seen as a hard and reactionary element in the Conservative party. On 28 September at 10 a.m., four hours before the deadline expired and without the approval of Hitler`s request to Czechoslovakia, the British Ambassador to Italy, Lord Perth, summoned the Italian Foreign Minister, Mr Galeazzo Ciano, to request an emergency meeting. [37] Perth informed Ciano that Chamberlain had ordered him to ask Mussolini in the negotiations and ask Hitler to delay the ultimatum. [37] At 11:00 a.m., Ciano met With Mussolini and informed him of Chamberlain`s proposal; Mussolini agreed and responded by questioning the Italian ambassador to Germany and telling him: “Go immediately to Fuhrer`s house and tell him that I will be by his side, but that I ask for a 24-hour delay before hostilities begin. In the meantime, I will study what can be done to solve the problem. [40] Hitler received Mussolini`s message during an interview with the French ambassador. Hitler told the ambassador: “My good friend, Benito Mussolini, asked me to delay the Marching Orders of the German Army by 24 hours, and I agreed.

Of course, this was not a concession, since the invasion date was set for October 1, 1938. [41] After a meeting with Chamberlain, Lord Perth Mussolini and Chamberlain`s request thanked Mussolini for attending a four-power conference in Munich on 29 September from the United Kingdom, France, Germany and Italy to resolve the Sudetenland problem before the 14:00 deadline.

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